All posts by Serenity

How to Vote in 2020 ~ Good luck!

There is less than 2 weeks left to register to vote in some states and last chance to vote is November 3rd (36 days away). This year is going to be more difficult to vote than in most other democracies due to difficulties with the post office and COVID.

This article covers easy ways on how to register, check status, vote by mail or vote in person. Social science proves that if you make a specific plan of when and where, you will stick to doing it. So if you are voting during this epic period in US history, I hope this information helps during because it feels like we are living in the Twilight Zone. (Read more below)

Register.

  • Overview of the registration laws and status by state (LINK)
  • Registration deadlines in all 50 states (LINK)

Check your registration BEFORE voting.

  • Registration status can be found here. (LINK)

OPTION 1 – This website is created by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) and offers the following
Register to Vote
Voter Registration Status
Find Your Polling Place
Valid Forms of ID
Absentee and Early Voting
Overseas Voters
Election Officals Directory
Become a Poll Worker

OPTION 2 – Vote.org is a nonprofit that was originally founded as Long Distance Voter in 2008. It has a bit of a head start on NASS and performs many of the same functions.
Check your Registration
Register to Vote
Vote by Mail
Polling Place Locator
Become a Poll Worker
Fill out your 2020 Census (deadline changed to Oct 5??)

Check your voting calendar.

  • In most states, you can vote early, even if you’re voting in person. (LINK)

Vote by mail (Absentee ballot)

  • Overview of the voting rules (LINK)
  • Online form to request a mail-in ballot (aka absentee ballot) (LINK)

Avoid your ballot being thrown out.

  • Historically, mail ballots are rejected much more often than in-person ballots (although some states are taking steps to reduce rejection rates this year). You should pay careful attention to your state’s rules for returning a ballot. In Pennsylvania, for example, you must enclose it in two envelopes. In North Carolina, a witness must sign your ballot. Ignore these rules, and your vote may be thrown out. (LINK)
  • To meet your state’s deadline for mail-in ballots, the safest bet is to vote as soon as you know which candidates you support. If you live in one of the many states with drop-off locations, you may want to visit one of them rather than mailing in the ballot due to problems with the postal service. (LINK)

Vote in person.

  • Postal Service delays are happening now and will get worse. Messaging may have to shift toward in-person voting as elections get closer. In many places, voting in person during the pandemic appears to be about as safe as going to the grocery store — low risk but not no risk. Many states are taking measures, like spacing out voting booths, to increase safety. Check to see what is happening where you live. (LINK)

Check your status AFTER voting.

  • Most states will also let you track the status of completed mail ballots. By tracking before the voting deadline, you might be able to fix a disqualified ballot. (LINK)

Volunteer.

  • If you want to volunteer this year for the election, OutVote might be a good resource for you. Since Trump spammed every email in America he could find, we do need a bit more balance in the electronic communications space and this is a great opportunity to do so, with permission. (LINK)

About the author: I’m a fire survivor who is trying to take the wisdom I acquired and turn it into a gift for the future. I sincerely hope that my effort to create a valuable legacy will be successful.

Currently I’m in a beach town in San Luis Obispo to escape the smoke. It’s been 6 weeks I’ve been gone from the Paradise/Chico area due to the fires. For the kind subscribers who helped with my hotel costs, THANK YOU!

To any that would still like to help, it would be gleefully appreciated. (PayPal Link). However please know that what I offer is a gift from the heart, unconditionally, so I hope you enjoy it. Kind words and feedback actually sustain me more than money to get up every day and keep trying. =) (Email link)

I have specific resiliency plans for displaced disaster survivors which is unique. I sincerely hope for the energy and time invested, that I am successful in doing this. ~ Time will tell!

Wishing you well. ~ Kimberly Carr


This newsletter is the product of SEVERAL days research.

Subscribe here
(Could help you or someone you know)

To do your own research visit these links.


Since there was a lot to cover, I split the resiliency info into 4 pages:

  1. How to have lots of fun and be safe this Halloween (CLICK HERE)
  2. How you can help frontline workers and their communities (CLICK HERE)
  3. How wildfire smoke affects your lungs. (Please protect yourself!) (CLICK HERE)
  4. How to Vote in 2020 ~ Good luck! (CLICK HERE)

How wildfire smoke affects your lungs. (Please protect yourself!)

UPDATE 09/28/20: With current events, you might want to know fire and air quality status ! THIS IS THE LINK (Glad visitors find this helpful!)


According to a research estimate at Stanford University, between 1,200 and 3,000 deaths have occurred from smoke in California between August 1 – September 1. This DOES NOT include estimates from the fires in September along the ENTIRE west coast! At risk populations are “infants and children, people aged 55 years and older, pregnant individuals and those with pre-existing heart and lung conditions.” For details about the research visit this (LINK).

Fire season doesn’t normally end in California til December.  As an experienced next responder behind the front lines of 5 years of firestorms, I personally experienced lung funk that lasted til the following spring after several fires. Symptoms will overlap with COVID, so front line workers are going to treat you as COVID-19 positive until otherwise determined. And of course getting COVID-19 with smoke lung funk will complicate recovery.

You may be curious biologically about what happens with smoke inhalation. This is what I learned:

"Wildfire smoke has over 400 toxins associated with it that enter the body through the lungs and can be absorbed into the blood... In the blood, these toxins can activate the immune system and platelets and the lining of blood vessels. When this happens, the inflammation can induce clots which lodge in the heart or the brain vessels and cause heart attacks or strokes."

The fire season in California is not over until the first rain, which could be as late as December. If you think you are a high risk category, you might consider picking up an air purifier, like I did at Home Depot for $150. It does offer a little peace of mind. And depending on how it is used, it can help with COVID-19.

Here’s some helpful links to consider, if shopping for a unit:

  • Rationale on usefulness of a HEPA filtration device (LINK)
  • Guidance on purchasing one (LINK)
  • Consumer report ratings (Please take cleaning advice seriously  because hospital HVAC techs have died from servicing HEPA filters used by COVID patients.) (LINK)

You might be interesting in looking at current air quality and fire status, which can be found at this (LINK)


About the author: I’m a fire survivor who is trying to take the wisdom I acquired and turn it into a gift for the future. I sincerely hope that my effort to create a valuable legacy will be successful.

Currently I’m in a beach town in San Luis Obispo to escape the smoke. It’s been 6 weeks I’ve been gone from the Paradise/Chico area due to the fires. For the kind subscribers who helped with my hotel costs, THANK YOU!

To any that would still like to help, it would be gleefully appreciated. (PayPal Link). However please know that what I offer is a gift from the heart, unconditionally, so I hope you enjoy it. Kind words and feedback actually sustain me more than money to get up every day and keep trying. =) (Email link)

I have specific resiliency plans for displaced disaster survivors which is unique. I sincerely hope for the energy and time invested, that I am successful in doing this. ~ Time will tell!

Wishing you well. ~ Kimberly Carr


This newsletter is the product of SEVERAL days research.

Subscribe here
(Could help you or someone you know)

To do your own research visit these links.


Since there was a lot to cover, I split the resiliency info into 4 pages:

  1. How to have lots of fun and be safe this Halloween (CLICK HERE)
  2. How you can help frontline workers and their communities (CLICK HERE)
  3. How wildfire smoke affects your lungs. (Please protect yourself!) (CLICK HERE)
  4. How to Vote in 2020 ~ Good luck! (CLICK HERE)

How you can help frontline workers and their communities

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a massive toll on healthcare workers and they need more than accolades as a hero, they need resources to be more resilient.

While they are fighting to obtain benefits for lost wages, medical bills and death benefits, county health officials who set the standards for safety protocols and economic re-opening are resigning, retiring or being fired in at least 15 states across the U.S.

These are problems that are too big for us to influence, but there (IS) something we can do to help health care workers and the surrounding community. We can offer crowdsourced RV housing to help them self-isolate after work. I founded a project to do this, which is now in pre-launch status.

Here is what you can do to help!

  1. We are seeking FT interns, PT volunteers and candidates for our non-profit board.
  2. We need RV storage in the bay area for our pilot project to loan to a front line worker. (Storage only, but if you want to host, let us know too!) (If you can’t offer a place, maybe you know someone who can?)

Learn more below.

We are seeking interns/volunteers and candidates for our non-profit board. 

  1. We currently have 4 interns and are seeking a few more with specific skill sets on a full time basis.  To learn more about the internships (CLICK HERE).
  2. If you would like to volunteer part time with social media and share post of offers for an RV or requests for one, that will also be very helpful. (CONTACT US HERE)
  3. If you would like to serve on our board, we are requesting a 5 hour a month minimum commitment.  We are seeking professionals with skills and wisdom in any of the following healthcare, media relations, fundraising, hr, accounting, nonprofit, and/or law.  To inquire, please (CONTACT US HERE)

We need RV storage in the Bay Area for our pilot project to loan to a front line worker.

The RV is coming from southern California.  We are seeking storage only, but if you want to host, let us know too!  We are currently negotiating an affordable RV insurance policy for front line workers.  Once we have that, we plan to do a pilot launch in the bay area before we scale.  Below is a picture of the RV we need to store.  If you can help (CONTACT US HERE)

An Introduction to RVMatchMaker

We have a long road to recovery.  By sharing wisdom, time and resources, no matter small, ads up collectively to a healthier and happier community.  To learn more about RVMatchMaker.org, please view the video below.

To subscribe to learn more about the launch of RVMatchMaker (CLICK HERE)


About the author: I’m a fire survivor who is trying to take the wisdom I acquired and turn it into a gift for the future. I sincerely hope that my effort to create a valuable legacy will be successful.

Currently I’m in a beach town in San Luis Obispo to escape the smoke. It’s been 6 weeks I’ve been gone from the Paradise/Chico area due to the fires. For the kind subscribers who helped with my hotel costs, THANK YOU!

To any that would still like to help, it would be gleefully appreciated. (PayPal Link). However please know that what I offer is a gift from the heart, unconditionally, so I hope you enjoy it. Kind words and feedback actually sustain me more than money to get up every day and keep trying. =) (Email link)

I have specific resiliency plans for displaced disaster survivors which is unique. I sincerely hope for the energy and time invested, that I am successful in doing this. ~ Time will tell!

Wishing you well. ~ Kimberly Carr


This newsletter is the product of SEVERAL days research.

Subscribe here
(Could help you or someone you know)

To do your own research visit these links.


Since there was a lot to cover, I split the resiliency info into 4 pages:

  1. How to have lots of fun and be safe this Halloween (CLICK HERE)
  2. How you can help frontline workers and their communities (CLICK HERE)
  3. How wildfire smoke affects your lungs. (Please protect yourself!) (CLICK HERE)
  4. How to Vote in 2020 ~ Good luck! (CLICK HERE)

How to have lots of fun and be safe this Halloween

Celebrating Halloween this year can be your BEST EVER with a little planning. With 30 days to go, parents need all the help they can get this year.

As if a COVID Halloween isn’t already spooky enough, it will also be on a Saturday, a blue moon and you get an extra-hour for daylight savings. So there is guaranteed weirdness with all the extra time people will have to think about how to celebrate.

Safe ideas presented include booing loved ones before Halloween (like reverse trick-or-treating), having a themed contest which might include Zooming and picture sharing from present and past, a themed dinner, ghost stories and games, dancing and karaoke and Halloween themed movies to wrap up the night.

For more party planning ideas than presented here, you might want to follow this (LINK) because it appears to be updated often:  Full disclosure I have no relation to any link and receive no commission.  They just seemed really helpful.

Plan a small home party and share part of it on Zoom!

Shared this Halloween with loved ones in your bubble or via Zoom.  This is especially wonderful for loved ones in self-isolating circumstances or who you want to share the holiday with, but are too far away.  Please adhere to the small gathering guidelines provided by your county and CDC. (LINK 1) (LINK 2)

You can pick a theme to give people creative direction or create categories in which they can win a prize for such as the funniest, cutest, weirdest, or scariest costume or best homemade.

In addition to other festivities, you can plan a fashion show to share your costume creations or pumpkins with prize categories as mentioned above. (Be sure to learn how to poll on Zoom before your gathering.) You can all reminisce about past Halloweens and the share costumes and experiences of your childhood. (Be sure to prepare pictures and short stories in advance.)

Before Halloween

Decorate Your House with the Kids – When you decorate your house, you might plan a path that you could use later for a treasure hunt in your backyard or inside your house. Black, orange, purple and/or white lights are often used. Decor can be anything from cut out black cat silhouettes, to tombstones made from boxes and crafted giant spiders with lots of webs. Home Depot has some interesting decorations, some of which is silly expensive, but still fun to look at even if you can’t afford such an indulgence.

Reverse trick or treating

  • Spread anonymous Halloween cheer with random acts of kindness in advance of Halloween. Fill a container (basket, bucket, bag, or cup) with treats. Be sure to think about how you can hang it on a door handle to keep it out of reach of small animals or plan a porch pickup location.
  • Fill the container with anything you can imagine: candy, stickers, temporary tattoos, balloons, bubbles, themed erasers, pencils, books, Dracula teeth, glow in the dark eyeballs, individually wrapped treats, or glow sticks. These are the same items you can use later in a treasure hunt too.
  • Consider including handmade drawings or paintings by kids. That would be especially appreciated by older neighbors.
  • Another great custom gift for the boo bag and your party favors is decorated face masks. So bust out the pens, glitter, sequins, and even tie-dye! Trace frightful shapes or fun patterns. People will treasure and enjoy one-of-a-kind creations.
  • Add be sure to add a personalized note in the bag that includes something like: “You’ve Been Booed! Thanks for being so wonderful!

Pumpkin carving or decorating – While this event can be done day of the party, it won’t be easy to include it in a Zoom party contest. So I think this idea would be most successful if done in advance. Here’s some links to get them into the creative spirit with pumpkins (LINK 1) (LINK 2)

Weird Science and Props for Ghost Storytelling 

  • Some of these tactile items can be used later for spooky story telling in the dark. I clearly remember this tactile experience from my own childhood and treasure that. It wasn’t really about how people saw me in my costume, it was about how the experience made me feel. Remember that when creating your own party because it was never the candy I remembered most.
  • You can mix up some fun using kitchen staples and household items. Like Vampire Slime (LINK) Frankenstein’s Phlegm (LINK) Ghost Rockets (LINK) Pumpkin Playdough (LINK)
  • Exploding Jack-o-Lanterns, shadow puppets, bug filled ice, witchy potions, optical illusions and more at (THIS LINK)

Halloween Night

Dress up for Dinner – Don’t just wear the costume, become the costume! Plan a Halloween feast for your family with one simple rule: Everyone must stay in costume AND in character for the entire meal! Give each participant some time to come up with an accent and a backstory for a memorable night.

Share a Ghoulish Dinner

  • Who says you can’t play with your food? There’s recipes for Feet-loaf (meatloaf) or Eye-Ball Pasta made with sliced mozzarella, Spider Pizza or the classic Mummy Dog. The possibilities are endless. Let your imagination run wild; experiment with cute, creepy, scary, and downright disgusting eats.
  • Here’s some links for ideas (LINK 1) (LINK 2) And you might think about buying candied googlie eyes in bulk you can easily add them to everything from popcorn to pancakes or homemade boo bag treats.

Make Porch Pics – Commemorate this once in a Blue Moon Halloween with some epic porch pics. Grab your camera and take some of your favorite monsters!

Play Games – There’s lots of game ideas on the internet, like the Bozo ball toss and pin the lid on the jack-o-lantern. You can also set up with quick crafts like a paper bag monster puppets or make an edible treat like decorating cupcakes.

Monster Mash Dance Party – Shake your “boo thang,” create a fun playlist and learn the dance moves from Micheal Jackson’s “Thriller.” Maybe the songs you choose are also played during the treasure hunt. That way if you do karaoke, the songs will be familiar to you.

Halloween Karaoke – Whether you’re pulling off a tribute to Thriller or going old school with some Monster Mash, creating a play list is sure to delight. Up the ante with awards for the best impersonation, funniest choreography or the greatest overall performance. There’s lots of pre-mixes available for purchase. (LINK 1)

Watch Halloween Movies – Toss some candy corn or eyeballs in your popcorn and watch Halloween movies. Children’s classics include “It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown.” For more ideas check Netflix or (THIS LINK) Whether for adults or children this is a great way to wind down the celebration and let them watch all night til they fall asleep.

Scavenger hunt tips and ideas

A Halloween scavenger hunt needs a little bit of advance planning, but it’s not too much work. A successful hunt includes clues, prizes and some decent hiding places. The most important thing is to get everything you need in advance, so there’s no scrambling for things to hide on the day of the hunt.

Clues and hiding spots

  • You can design the hunt to follow the clues to search for actual items or symbols for prize redemption. There could be prizes at each reveal spot or sometimes a clue leading you to the next spot.
  • It can be fun coming up with your own clues, but can be quite time-consuming. These are links to printable images that can be used with young kids or can give you ideas to make your own hunting passport  (LINK 1) (LINK 2)
  • If you want to buy a pre-made kit or prizes like bouncing glowing eyeballs, here is an Amazon (LINK 1) (LINK 2)
  • To make the hunt more interesting for older children, set a shorter time limit and hide fewer prizes to make them even more sought-after.
  • For hiding spots considering turning down the lights for ambiance and to make the clues harder to spot. You might also want some basic ground rules so you don’t end up with a mess, such as if they move something to search, they must put it back as they found it or forfeit the prize.

Prizes

  • You can hide treasure like candy, toys or even make some gift certificates to stay up late, choose the movie or eat an extra piece of candy.
  • Homemade prizes are the best, but purchased prizes are easy and sometimes cool. Spirit stores are opening in spite of the pandemic (LINK) To be honest though I wanted to puke a little in my mouth when I typed “toys” into the search bar and the top search results was a grenade, guns and cowboy outfits. )Whaaat?( I’d rather go to the Dollar Store thanks, but you still might get some great costume ideas.

I hope these ideas offered inspire you to have a joyful, memorable and safe Halloween!


About the author:  I’m a fire survivor who is trying to take the wisdom I acquired and turn it into a gift for the future.  I sincerely hope that my effort to create a valuable legacy will be successful.

Currently I’m in a beach town in San Luis Obispo to escape the smoke.  It’s been 6 weeks I’ve been gone from the Paradise/Chico area due to the fires.  For the kind subscribers who helped with my hotel costs, THANK YOU!

To any that would still like to help, it would be gleefully appreciated. (PayPal Link).  However please know that what I offer is a gift from the heart, unconditionally, so I hope you enjoy it.  Kind words and feedback actually sustain me more than money to get up every day and keep trying. =) (Email link)

I have specific resiliency plans for displaced disaster survivors which is unique. I sincerely hope for the energy and time invested, that I am successful in doing this. ~ Time will tell!

Wishing you well. ~ Kimberly Carr


This newsletter is the product of SEVERAL days research.

Subscribe here
(Could help you or someone you know)

To do your own research visit these links.


Since there was a lot to cover, I split the resiliency info into 4 pages:

  1. How to have lots of fun and be safe this Halloween (CLICK HERE)
  2. How you can help frontline workers and their communities (CLICK HERE)
  3. How wildfire smoke affects your lungs. (Please protect yourself!) (CLICK HERE)
  4. How to Vote in 2020 ~ Good luck! (CLICK HERE)

West Coast Fires – September 12, 2020

(CLICK HERE) for the other page I made for you on COVID-19 fall preparation.


What is West Coast fire status and where is smoke now?

For the past 5 years I’ve been behind the front lines of firestorms. I almost died in my own home loss and have strong ideas about improving outcomes in disasters. (More on this later.)

Links for current status and health

  • Smoke and fire (Earth satellite views) (Click on link for west coast fires)
  • Fire status (Zoom in tight to see latest fire activity)
  • National air quality
  • Wind flow (Current and forecasted)
  • CalFire (Reports daily approx. 7am & 7pm)
  • Evacuated? Need a hotel. Try this link.
  • Breathed in too much smoke? See news notes on “How do I protect myself indoors as fall approaches?here.
  • Fires on September 12, 2020 above 75,000 acres in western coastal states from north to south (See below)

(This is a photo from the NorthComplexFire near Oroville Damn.  Due to scale of disasters and time constraints I do not plan to update this section, unless circumstances warrant.)

Fires on September 12, 2020 above 75,000 acres in western coastal states from north to south

If evacuating, you could lose signal or battery. Update your voicemail with status and evacuation plans. Simple evacuation: pack loved ones, photos, computer and life saving medications.

This is a good link to look at reporting on any national fire incident.

WASHINGTON

Overall, Washington was hit hard and still has a lot of fire fighting to do, but they appear to be getting control on their fires quickly. #WAWildfire This is a very good link for Washington state.

On Twitter, click on “latest” rather “top”.

OREGON

Their communication standards on social media have not been good and there is little centralized command that I could find.  Apparently the governor was trying to make this problem a priority to fix and I’m sure it will be now. #oregonwildfires #OregonFires2020

Much of the areas burning have very dense fuel. Overall they are feeling a lot of pain and chaos due to most of their general population living in proximity to the fires are along the I5 Corridor.

There top 3 fires listed below, south of Portland, are merging into a complex fire, which is very bad. #PDXFires #ClackamasWildfires #ClackamasFires

This evacuation map demonstrates how dire the situation is and there is no reported containment at the time of this evaluation.

Search by these hashtags and click on “latest” rather “top”.

Medford is doing better, with 50% containment, but like the rest of the state is suffering greatly due to air quality.

  • Hashtags/FireLocation Acres
  • #ArchieCreek (Alt: #AlmedaFire #ClackamasFires #RogueValleyFires) 115,949

CALIFORNIA

For more details, follow the hashtags on Twitter.  Alternatively try this link for CalFire.or this link.

CalFire Managed Incidents

Federally Managed Incidents

#CastleFire jumped onto this list at 4pm today (9/12) Mandatory evacuations. This is also known as the #SQFComplex and is now much bigger than 68,000 acres.

 


About the author:  I’m a fire survivor who is trying to take the wisdom I acquired and turn it into a gift for the future.  I sincerely hope that this effort to create a valuable legacy will be successful.

Currently I’m in a beach town in San Luis Obispo to escape the smoke.  It’s been 6 weeks I’ve been gone from the Paradise/Chico area due to the fires.  For the kind subscribers who helped with my hotel costs, THANK YOU!

To any that would still like to help, it would be gleefully appreciated. (PayPal Link).  However please know that what I offer is a gift from the heart, unconditionally, so I hope you enjoy it.  Kind words and feedback actually sustain me more than money to get up every day and keep trying. =) (Email link)

I have specific resiliency plans for displaced disaster survivors which is unique. I sincerely hope the energy and time invested, I am successful in doing this. ~ Time will tell!

Wishing you well. ~ Kimberly Carr

COVID-19 Fall Preparation – September 12, 2020

(CLICK HERE) for the other page I made for you on tracking the west coast fires


Below is what you will find on this page:

How can I prepare for fall surge of COVID-19?

  • What are current COVID-19 stats nationally?
  • Is it true the virus may surge in the fall and why?
  • How do I protect myself indoors as fall approaches?
  • What are some good tips on cleaning?
  • What is the average timelines for positive cases?
  • How can I self quarantine with shared living space?
  • My friend is hosting a home party. How can we stay safe?
  • COVID-19, fires and upcoming election sucks. Can I have a laugh PLEASE?

What are current COVID-19 stats nationally?

Nationally, COVID-19 cases and deaths are in a slight decline.  It is too early to tell if it’s based on seasonal variation or other factors. As states begin to loosen restrictions, please proceed with caution and carefully monitor your county health department. (See this CDC link for historical trends of other viruses.)

National hot spots continue to reside in areas with frequent travel and dense populations, most notably in the metro areas of Miami, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio.

Along our international border with Mexico, in smaller counties, there is a notable presence of COVID-19.  News articles indicate significant travel in both directions for work, school, or medical care.

Outbreak Status Links

  • Center for Disease Control (LINK)
  • Outbreak statistics (LINK) (LINK)

Is it true the virus may surge in the fall?

Yes.  Notable institutions like Harvard and MIT created a collaborating working paper to answer the question. They examined 3,739 locations worldwide to determine the “relative covid-19 risk due to weather.” They found that average temperatures above 77 degrees are associated with a reduction in virus transmission.

Each additional 1.8-degree temperature increase above that level was associated with an additional 3.1 percent reduction in the virus’s reproduction number, called R0. (Pronounced “R naught”) That is the average number of new infections generated by each infected person. When the R0 drops below 1, an epidemic begins to wane, although it doesn’t happen overnight. Here’s the reference.

The CDC has been tracking virus seasonality by US Census for a long time. This shows you the variation by region of the country. Take a look at what happens when fall begins.

It is my opinion that the virus won’t stop spreading over the summer, but the viral load will decline. When daily temperatures drop below 77 degrees in the fall, we can expect a very fierce surge of this virus.

How do I protect myself indoors as fall approaches? (Or deal with lung fung from the smoke of west coast fires)

  1. Get HEPA air filters. – Either portable or filters for a whole house system.  Good quality is getting hard to come by so plan ahead.  See this link provided by the EPA
  2. Deep breathing – Either thru mindfulness breathing or exercise.   The following breathing exercises are super important to practice NOW so when you get the virus, this exercise will be second nature to you. (LINK 1) (LINK 2)
  3. Stay well hydrated. – To fight off infection and clear the lungs drinking lots of fluid is recommended.  Soups are a wonderful thing in the fall.  Fresh lemon water is wonderful if regular water is boring to you.
  4. Mega-dosing on vitamins –  This might help you.  It helped stop my 3 month lung fung.  (See below.)
  5. Nasal rinse. Even if you think you are clear, you’d be surprised how good it can make your breathing feel!

I mega-dose on vitamins. I did this because I am medically sensitive with impaired breathing and need surgery which I can’t do now. It is very interesting to note that within 4 days of mega-dosing, my lung infection from the winter of 2019 went away immediately. (Don’t know why exactly, but it got my attention!)

These are my doses in addition to a multi-vitamin. (LINK1) (LINK2)

  • Vitamin C: 3,000 milligrams in divided doses
  • Vitamin D3: 2,000 International Units daily
  • Magnesium: 400 milligrams daily
  • Zinc: 20 milligrams daily
  • Selenium: 100 micrograms daily

Iron and zinc can be particularly upsetting to the stomach so I take those less frequently and it helped. Take vitamins with food. (LINK)

What are some good tips on cleaning?

How long the virus persists on surfaces depends on what kind of surface it is. Studies found that the virus lived longest on stainless steel and polypropylene, which is a type of plastic used in everything from toys to car parts. Soft surfaces tended to be less hospital to the longevity of the virus.

Where the virus survives and how to clean surfaces is critical to know. One issue I see people SCREWING UP CONSTANTLY is the length of time a disinfectant is left on the surface. — The surface should be wet for at least a minute, and with bleach even longer. Read this very valuable article!!! And for more information here is CDC guidance for cleaning your environment.

UV-C spectrum lights are very helpful for destroying the virus. There are 3 UV spectrums. However UV-C is very dangerous to the skin and can cause eye cataracts. If you use this light, it works work great, but stay out of the room while it is in use. UV-C is most effective on solid surfaces and not great on soft surfaces where particles can hide. This video explains how the lights work.

Beware of the fake LEDs on Amazon. Real UV-C bulbs are mercury vapor tubes. Real UV-C will cause bananas to brown very fast, so that’s a good test at home to know if it works.

What is the -AVERAGE- timelines for positive cases?

  • At diagnosis 80%  of cases are mild/moderate, 15%  severe, 5% critical
  • Viral shedding is greatest at time symptoms start
  • From exposure to symptom onset 5-6 days+
  • From symptom onset to recovery for mild cases  is 2 weeks
  • Severe recovery time is 3-6 weeks
  • Symptom onset to death 2-8 weeks

How can I self quarantine with shared living space?

Keep in mind that it can take up to 14 days after initial exposure to test positive. During the quarantine and/or recovery period a household member should not share bedrooms, bathrooms or kitchen, regardless of probable or confirmed exposure.

The greatest difficulty adapting to isolation is to have a private bathroom. Most living situations can accommodate for private bedrooms and packaged meals. Having pets or members of the household with pre-existing conditions become important factors in containing a potential viral presence within the home.

If members of your family cannot feel safe within their current living environment, you need to know this IN ADVANCE and be prepared to adapt. Options outside the home include a hotel, RV or other designated safe space.

For more details on this topic from the CDC, please visit this link.

My friend is hosting a home party. How can we stay safe?

I just recently had a friend that hosted a church gathering in her backyard.  I honestly was very uncomfortable with some things I saw and took this as a good learning opportunity.

For example, all food and beverage items needed to be single serve.  No sharing utensils.  And use a huge table so people can not be so crowded around the food.  Space chairs well.  Make people RSVP and limit attendance.  Provide hand wipes and discourage usage of your house bathroom unless necessary.  Anyone coughing, sniffling or sneezing should politely abstain from attending.

Every event will have different points of vulnerability, so I recommend reviewing what the CDC offers.  They did a good job elaborating on many important points on managing events at this link.

And don’t believe me about how fast germs spread with people?  Then please check out this video.  It should cure any doubters.

COVID-19, fires and upcoming election suck. Can I have a laugh PLEASE?


Bohemian Rhapsody... This would make Freddie Mercury of Queen proud.

 


About the author:  I’m a fire survivor who is trying to take the wisdom I acquired and turn it into a gift for the future.  I sincerely hope that this effort to create a valuable legacy will be successful.

Currently I’m in a beach town in San Luis Obispo to escape the smoke.  It’s been 6 weeks I’ve been gone from the Paradise/Chico area due to the fires.  For the kind subscribers who helped with my hotel costs, THANK YOU!

To any that would still like to help, it would be gleefully appreciated. (PayPal Link).  However please know that what I offer is a gift from the heart, unconditionally, so I hope you enjoy it.  Kind words and feedback actually sustain me more than money to get up every day and keep trying. =) (Email link)

I have specific resiliency plans for displaced disaster survivors which is unique. I sincerely hope the energy and time invested, I am successful in doing this. ~ Time will tell!

Wishing you well. ~ Kimberly Carr

CV Update May 17, 2020

Welcome to the next CV19 update. Glad many people have appreciated these updates. It keeps me focused on what is important too. This week I’m focusing health and safety in light of re-opening beginning.

We are at a point in our collective experience where the adrenaline is waning and emotion surfaces more strongly about what is happening and where we go from here.

In brief the real stats are very under-reported and vigilant cleaning and distancing practices are needed. People will have varying standards of what that means and should plan to act accordingly.

In this update you will find the following:

  1. Where is virus spreading
  2. Warm weather impact on virus spread
  3. Important info on keeping clean and safe
  4. Personal reflections on an epic disaster

Where is virus spreading

We designed a customized statistics dashboard to be informed where the most need exists by county for the entire U.S. As I mentioned previously, I’m working on a project to help COVID front line workers by offering crowdsourced RVs. This tool will help us optimize resources offered thru RVMatchMaker.ORG.

You are getting this special view into what we are working on. I thought you would find this insight helpful. This is view of county stats in California last updated on 5/2/20.
This tool is in draft form. We won’t be sharing facility specific data and in fact it is difficult to obtain nationwide, due to variations in reporting.

The crowdsourced RV project will help with vector control, because frontline workers carry the highest viral load. If you want to volunteer some time on this important COVID project, we would be delighted! You can contact us here. (We would especially love help with press management, legal review, and guiding people to resources on social media that have questions.)

A unique US county map of COVID cases which was created for us in the same vein of reporting logic. There’s over 3,100 counties in the US, so that’s a heck of a lot of daily data to slice thru.

Warm weather impact on virus spread

With businesses re-opening and summer fast approaching, the question we are all asking is how safe are we to do so?

Notable institutions like Harvard and MIT created a collaborating working paper to answer the question. They examined 3,739 locations worldwide to determine the “relative covid-19 risk due to weather.” They found that average temperatures above 77 degrees are associated with a reduction in virus transmission.

Each additional 1.8-degree temperature increase above that level was associated with an additional 3.1 percent reduction in the virus’s reproduction number, called R0. (Pronounced “R naught”) That is the average number of new infections generated by each infected person. When the R0 drops below 1, an epidemic begins to wane, although it doesn’t happen overnight. Here’s the reference.

That correlated with data I saw almost 2 months ago. The CDC has been tracking virus seasonality by US Census for a long time. This shows you the variation by region of the country. Take a look at what happens when fall begins.

It is my opinion that the virus won’t stop spreading over the summer, but the viral load will decline. When daily temperatures drop below 77 degrees we can expect a very fierce surge of this virus that will cripple the economy globally for 6 months. How do you think you are going to prepare for that? I’d sincerely like to know your thoughts. Please tell me your thoughts here.

Important info on keeping clean and safe

How long the virus persists on surfaces depends on what kind of surface it is. Studies found that the virus lived longest on stainless steel and polypropylene, which is a type of plastic used in everything from toys to car parts. Soft surfaces tended to be less hospital to the longevity of the virus.

Where the virus survives and how to clean surfaces is critical to know. One issue I see people SCREWING UP CONSTANTLY is the length of time a disinfectant is left on the surface. — The surface should be wet for at least a minute, and with bleach even longer. Read this very valuable article!!! And for more information here is CDC guidance for cleaning your environment.

Below is a video that demonstrates how easily the virus spreads and the opinion of WHO on the future transmission risks.


UV-C spectrum lights are very helpful for destroying the virus. There are 3 UV spectrums. However UV-C is very dangerous to the skin and can cause eye cataracts. If you use this light, it works work great, but stay out of the room while it is in use. UV-C is most effective on solid surfaces and not great on soft surfaces where particles can hide. This video explains how the lights work.

Beware of the fake LEDs on Amazon. Real UV-C bulbs are mercury vapor tubes. Real UV-C will cause bananas to brown very fast, so that’s a good test at home to know if it works.

Personal reflections on an epic disaster

Unlike the 5 years of fire storm recoveries I’ve witnessed in California, there is no neighboring community to escape to in this disaster. We have to find refuge from within ourselves, in gratitude and love. — These are the most precious things we have when everything else is lost.

With practice it gets easier to “do disasters”, but it’s NEVER easy. Uncertainty creates anxiety, which in turn affects how we sleep and feel in our daily lives.

I personally hoped to use this forced time for sheltering to work on pet projects, develop skills or relationships, but instead I’ve been working on creating a crowdsourced RV platform to help front-line workers reduce COVID spread.

The EXTREME fatigue I feel now is because my mind won’t unwind and allow me to sleep properly for the past 2 weeks. I’m being denied a major surgery right now and I have to live with impaired lung function during this pandemic. There’s more challenges I face that I imagine would humble most people that are struggling with their new normal. I may share those with you later… or not.

…But I can share these words with you now and hope you find some strength in these thoughts I offer you.

Wishing you well ~ Kimberly

Back to main COVID page.

CV Update April 26, 2020

Welcome to the next C19 update. I find making a commitment to sharing with you what I learn helps me be disciplined in keeping current.

This week I’m focusing on the front-line COVID workers.  Most Americans don’t see what they are experiencing; the impact on their work environment and their family lives.

What you will find in this update is

  1. What is my favorite news source and why? (Emergent data and a word from Bill Gates)
  2. What is the most inspiring thing I saw someone do for someone else? (The most inspiring thing this week can be from you!)
  3. What is the funniest COVID video, image or story I saw this week? (Keeping spirits up on the front lines.)

What is my favorite news source and why?

(Emergent data and a word from Bill Gates)

Staying ahead of the curve is VERY difficult!  This is really important when allocating precious resources.  If you have better ideas, PLEASE share them.

  1. Data from GitHub which is published in the NYT
  2. Raw Data from GitHub
  3. SalesForce is launching a tool to customize your own dashboard

I’m following Bill Gates because, aside from our government, he is one of the most active representative for the U.S. in funding and initiatives.  He is breaking his foundation’s activities to focus on into five categories: treatments, vaccines, testing, contact tracing, and policies for opening up.

What is the most inspiring thing I saw someone do for someone else?

The most inspiring thing this week can be from you!

What is the funniest COVID video, image or story I saw this week?

Keeping spirits up on the front lines.


And to wrap up… the essential you need to know on this article about severe fatigue and trauma and how to cope is GRACE and COMPASSION:

At the essential core of coping and self-care during this time is simply remembering to focus on grace and self-compassion as you navigate this unprecedented time. Take a walk, take a bath, take a nap, take deep breaths, ask for help, help where you can, and know that whatever you are feeling is completely normal, and whatever you need to do to love on and care for you during this time is okay. No guilt, only grace, as we walk this uncharted territory together.

Wishing you well ~ Kimberly


Back to main COVID page.

 

 

CV Update April 19, 2020

Welcome to the next update. I find making a commitment to sharing with you what I learn helps me be disciplined in keeping current.  I’m very involved in a volunteer COVID relief effort and don’t have time to watch the news every day. Maybe you find the same time challenge too.

What you will find in this update is

  1. What is my favorite news source and why? (FAQ in NYT, masks, contact tracing, additional financial resources, etc)
  2. What is the most inspiring thing I saw someone do for someone else?
  3. What is the funniest COVID video, image or story I saw this week?

What is my favorite news source and why?

The New York Times – I’m really busy. I enjoy their daily briefing digest on COVID for free. (LINK) Or subscribe at $4 a month (LINK)

I learn useful information here constantly. I don’t have time to summarize this week, but the biggest question we all have is the following:

What does the year ahead look like? (ARTICLE LINK)

There will be no quick return to normal American life, but there is hope for managing the outbreak now and in the long term. Our global health reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr. spoke to over 20 experts on what to expect in the coming months.

Some of their predictions:

  • The lockdowns will end haltingly. Putting safety first could mean reopening only after coronavirus cases declined for 14 days, 90 percent of contacts of infected people could be traced, infections of health care workers were eradicated, recuperation sites existed for mild cases — and many other hard-to-reach goals.
  • It is not clear whether recovery from the virus and antibodies confer immunity. If they do, or are believed to, America could be split into two classes: those protected (or thought to be) and those still vulnerable.
  • The virus can be kept in check, but only with expanded resources like widespread testing. And treatments are likely to arrive before a vaccine.
Other Helpful Reads:
  • This is a must read article. It covers answers to frequently asked questions from dealing with mortgages to health insurance. I’m pretty sure they will continue to expand answers when available. (LINK)
  • An article is on masks.  Caring for them, making them and more. (LINK)
  • Massachusetts is the first state to implement a contact tracing program.  Learn about how it works at this (LINK)
  • This piece of news is from our local news outlet in Butte County.  If you are having trouble accessing your unemployment benefits, ask your employer if compensation is an option, under the “Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act”.  Microsoft gave their employees 12 weeks paid leave under this option. (LINK  Here’s the (LINK) to the Department of Labor

What is the most inspiring thing I saw someone do for someone else?

A doctor has some interesting ideas to help increase oxygen levels for COVID patients. By sharing what hospitals are learning, it can help people self-treating too.

Here’s the back story: Obesity may be a bigger risk factor than asthma. Young adults with obesity appear to be at particular risk, even if they have no other health issues. It’s not yet known why, though doctors note that abdominal obesity can compress the diaphragm, lungs & chest capacity.

Some patients, by taking oxygen & rolling onto their sides or on their bellies, have quickly returned to normal oxygen levels. The tactic is called proning.

A doctor bought a special table for pregnant women which he found helpful for virus patients. Story here (LINK)

What is the funniest COVID video, image or story I saw this week?

For those binge watching on Netflix, check out Community. It’s a bunch of comedians riffing in a spoof about college students going no where and having fun getting there.

I really enjoy watching stuff that pulls me out of my current reality and is goofy. I pulled this skit out of Episode 3. It wasn’t written for the COVID pandemic, but it fit this context!!!

What are you watching? Would love to know. Email me or share below.

And to wrap up… the essential you need to know on this article about severe fatigue and trauma and how to cope is GRACE and COMPASSION:

At the essential core of coping and self-care during this time is simply remembering to focus on grace and self-compassion as you navigate this unprecedented time. Take a walk, take a bath, take a nap, take deep breaths, ask for help, help where you can, and know that whatever you are feeling is completely normal, and whatever you need to do to love on and care for you during this time is okay. No guilt, only grace, as we walk this uncharted territory together.

Wishing you well ~ Kimberly


Back to main COVID page.